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Eisenhower Matrix for Decision Making




The Eisenhower Decision Matrix is a popular decision-making tool created by legendary U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower. It is designed to help prioritize tasks by distinguishing between important and urgent tasks.


The matrix has four quadrants –

Important and Urgent,

Important but Not Urgent,

Not Important but Urgent,

and Not Important and Not Urgent.


The Important and Urgent quadrant applies to tasks that must be completed right away and cannot be postponed. These tasks often involve a crisis or a deadline that needs to be met. Examples of tasks in this quadrant include urgent emails, important meetings, and responding to a customer complaint.


The Important but Not Urgent quadrant applies to tasks that should be done soon, but don’t have an immediate deadline. These tasks may require more planning than the urgent tasks, but they are still important. Examples of tasks in this quadrant include brainstorming and research, learning new skills, and developing relationships.


The Not Important but Urgent quadrant applies to tasks that don’t need to be done right away, but are still pressing. These tasks are often considered distractions and should be done as quickly as possible. Examples of tasks in this quadrant include responding to emails from acquaintances and low-priority tasks.


The Not Important and Not Urgent quadrant applies to tasks that don’t need to be done at all. These tasks are often considered “time wasters” and should be avoided. Examples of tasks in this quadrant include checking social media, watching TV, and playing video games.


Using the Eisenhower Decision Matrix can help prioritize tasks quickly and efficiently. By focusing on the important and urgent tasks, you can ensure that you are always working on the most important tasks. This can help you stay focused and productive, and ultimately help you achieve your goals.